Buying At Estate Sales – Keeping Up With Technology, Credit, Cash, or Check

MP900422348Estate liquidators are continuously having to keep up with market conditions and changing technology such as social media and now with the ability to use credit cards to further assist and provide even more services for their clients and customers.

Up until 5 years ago most estate sale companies accepted either cash or in some areas checks too. The technology to accept charge cards at a private residence was mostly unavailable and was not able to be accepted by most liquidators. Today that has changed. A vast number of estate liquidators now accept credit cards.

Recently Estate Sales News asked 700 plus estate sale companies about how they accept credit card payment.

We gleaned much from their answers and the input they provided.

The number one provider from the responses we received is Square. This can be used by iPhone or Android and depending on the companys’ choice of reader they can either swipe or read a chip from a credit card.

The number two choice was PayPal. A triangular reader that can work with iPhone, iPad or Android along with their app.

Intuit QuickBooks Go Payments also works with iPhone, iPad and Android.

Other companies that are used by estate liquidators are Amazon, First Data, Merchant Warehouse, SharkPay by Capitol One, Bank of America and EPN Resellers.

There was discussion among the estate sale companies that responded as to why they chose the company they use and one fact stood out more than any other. They have researched and done their due diligence.

In today’s fast paced world of estate liquidation keeping informed and providing additional services such as credit card acceptance is key to helping be a successful estate sale company.

** Consumers please note that when you use a credit card at an estate sale simply disliking the product you received isn’t grounds for a chargeback – as the National Consumer Law Center notes in it’s guide to credit card rights “You cannot raise a complaint about the quality of merchandise or services you bought with a credit card in the form of a billing dispute”. While being disappointed with the quality of your purchase it will usually be covered under the retailer’s (estate sale companys’) return policy, which can be hand written or printed on receipts as All Sales Final, No Returns, No Refunds or Exchanges, All Sales As Is. This is an alert to let you know that if you try to receive a credit back on your charge card, it probably won’t happen.  It’s not grounds for getting your bank involved. This information was derived from www.dailyfinance.com

 

 

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