Demographics Help Determine What’s Selling And What’s Not At Estate Sales

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breast-cancer-ribbon-300x300Demographics are a prime factor in determining what is selling and what isn’t and where.

In California Mid-Century modern is still continuing along with Asian antiques and collectibles and art.

In Michigan, selling antiques depends on whether it is rare, unusual, or an item that is fairly common such as Eastlake beds and desks.

In New Jersey, along with a slowing antiques market there appears to be an over abundance of new and high end furniture.

Florida is also experiencing new furniture over flow, but also antiques brought from the north by retirees.

Whatever area of the country you live in ask your estate sale company what’s in and what’s not in your area and how they will market these items. Items that are not selling in your area may disappoint you, but more than likely will sell for significantly lower prices. If you really love the piece, keep it, otherwise let it go, and move forward.

Millenials (20-30 year olds) prefer new and contemporary with the minimalist look. Ikea is more for them. They aren’t worried about future value, only how it appears now. Those of us in the boomer generation grew up with antiques and an eclectic mix handed down from our grandparents and what our parents collected.

Your editor knows this first hand. I have a 10×20 storage unit and now must sort through the items I can’t part with and let the rest go. It’s part of moving forward.

When you interview estate sale companies ask questions about what’s selling. If they don’t seem to know or appear unfamiliar with the local market, you may want to consider another more experienced and knowledgeable liquidator.

Whatever you choose, you aren’t alone. Thousands are trying to sell at the same time so be prepared, hire a company that you have trust and confidence in, and remember where you live will affect what sells and for how much.

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