Estate Sale Etiquette Is Important Any Time Of The Year

Estate sale etiquette is important any time of the year.

Buyers are what makes an estate sale a financial success or bust, however, buyers  should follow some basic etiquette for estate sales.

EstateSalesNews.com hears often from estate sales liquidators from across the country. All of them agree that during that over the last few years, the buyers showing up at estate sales have become increasingly demanding and on occasion difficult to work with or satisfy.

Buyers become argumentative in lining up for entrance into estate sales.

All most all estate sale companies post their terms and conditions on estate sale listing advertising websites. Please read. See what entrance system, if any they are using. Don’t create chaos.

When lining up for entry to the sale follow the directions of the estate liquidator. Pushing, shoving and arguing may result in not gaining entrance to the sale. What ever the entrance procedure is be it a list, number system, cards or initial time of arrival respect the estate liquidator and your fellow buyers.

Many estate sales companies limit the number of buyers that can enter to ensure security for the items in the sale and safety of the buyers and liquidation staff.

If you are a seller and insist on being present during your estate sale let the professional estate sale company you hired handle the buyers, negotiations, and entry to the sale.

If you have a house listed for sale with a Realtor, be sure your Realtor understands that if their buyer wants to purchase items at the sale this must be done well before the sale is advertised or show up and line up like the public to enter the sale. Once items have been advertised it creates bad feelings for all and can erupt into problems for all concerned.

Attending an estate sale requires etiquette and patience so do your part as a buyer. It benefits everyone.

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